How the Kansas House Committee on Education Voted on HB 2289

Kansas-State-Capitol

I was able to obtain a breakdown of how the members of the Kansas House Committee on Education voted on their anti-Common Core bill, HB 2289, that was defeated 7-11 in committee on 3/21.

Yes
Kelly (R)
Bradford (R)
Dove (R)
Ghandi (R)
Lunn (R)
Highland (R)
Hedke (R)
No
Cassidy (D)
Trimmer (D)
Boldra (R)
Bridges (D)
Dierks (R)
Ewy (R)
Houston (D)
Lusk (D)
Meigs (R)
Rooker (R)
Winn (D)
Abstain
Grossrode (R)

State Representative John Bradford (R-Lansing) told me this morning that he is not giving up on this bill and plans to hold town halls this morning, as well as, encourage Kansans to attend state school board meetings.  I would expect to see him file this bill again next legislative session.

This issue is how we separate the wheat from the chaff.  So pay attention how your legislators vote on bills like these.  If they supported local control, they would not vote against bills like these.  If they care about an appropriate constitutional process they would not vote against bills like this.  If they cared about content that was actually benchmarked and field-tested, they would not vote in favor of the Common Core.

I also have to wonder where Kansas Governor Sam Brownback stands on this.  If he was against it, why is he allowing the Kansas Department of Education advocate for the Common Core?  Giving him the benefit of the doubt, perhaps it is a state constitutional issue that prevents him from intervening, but if that isn’t the case he has some explaining to do.

I was told that the Republicans who voted against HB 2289 bought the Kansas Department of Education and education establishment arguments hook, line and sinker.  Remember that when they are up for re-election.

Photo Credit: Holley St. Germain via Flickr (CC-By-NC-SA 2.0)

2 thoughts on “How the Kansas House Committee on Education Voted on HB 2289

  1. I am confused by the wording of the bill. What if a standard set mirrored a common core standard? Would it have been not allowed? I would like to see some protections for homeschools and private schools included in some bill somewhere, even if not through the ed committee. There might be a way through another committee.

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