Common Core Soon to Be No More in Kansas?

I read a slightly obnoxious article in Lawrence Journal-World about how Common Core will suddenly become a thing of the past in Kansas. I call it obnoxious because it just spouted off Common Core advocate talking points, and did not cite a single opponent. It also said Common Core would be “no more” without demonstrating how the new standards will be different.

The Kansas State Board of Education adopted new math standards in August. I looked on the Kansas Department of Education website, and it said they were not available yet.

Not available yet when the Board just approved the final draft? That was in August; it is now October.

I was able to find them by digging through the Board’s packet of materials for their August Board meeting and scrolling down to page 185.

Since the final draft of the 2017 math standards has been approved, I wanted to compare their “new” math standards with their 2010 standards.

Kansas’ new standards still include the Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practice verbatim.

Kindergarten

They tweak some of the standards. An example: K.CC.1 (2010) says, “Count to 100 by ones and by tens.” The 2017 standard says, “Count to 100 by ones and by tens and identify as a growth pattern.”

They moved around some of the standards. For example, they split up K.CC.3. The 2010 standard reads, “Write numbers from 0 to 20. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0–20 (with 0 representing a count of no objects).” K.CC.3 now reads, “Read and write numerals from 0 to 20.” The rest of the 2010 standard, “Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-20 (with 0 representing a count of no objects)” now becomes K.CC.4d.

First Grade

They rewrote 1.NBT.4 which did not change the standard, but made it easier to read.

Here’s the old standard: “Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.”

The new standard:

1.NBT.4. Add within 100 using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used including: (1.NBT.4)

1.NBT.4a Adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number (1.NBT.4)
1.NBT.4b Adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10 (1.NBT.4)
1.NBT.4c Understanding that when adding two-digit numbers, combine like base-ten units such as tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten. (1.NBT.4)

Second Grade

They added a new 2.NBT.1c to 2.NBT.1., “Show flexibility in composing and decomposing hundreds, tens, and ones.” It then gave examples.

2.MD.9 is new, “Identify coins and bills and their values.”

Third Grade

They split the 2010 3.MD.2 standard into two standards, beyond that the language is the same.

Fourth Grade

Several Measurement and Data standards have been moved to the 8th-Grade Geometry standards (see below). Beyond that nothing has changed.

Fifth Grade

I did not notice any significant changes.

Sixth Grade

6.RP.3 has been reorganized. They combined part of 6.RP.3a and 6.RP.3b. 6.RP.3c (2010) is now 6.RP.3b. 6.RP.3d (2010) is now 6.RP.3c. It did not change the standard at all.

6.NS.5 has been similarly reorganized to include 6.NS.5a and 6.NS.5b. All of the original language from the 2010 standard is still present.

The 2010 6.EE.3 and 6.EE.4 2010 standards have been combined. It now reads (without the examples), “Apply the properties of operations and combine like terms, with the conventions of algebraic notation, to identify and generate equivalent expressions.” The phrase “with the conventions of algebraic notation” is the new language in that standard.

Seventh Grade

The 2010 7.NS.1c standard was changed. It originally reads, “Understand subtraction of rational numbers as adding the additive inverse, p – q = p + (–q). Show that the distance between two rational numbers on the number line is the absolute value of their difference, and apply this principle in real-world contexts.”

It’s now 7.NS.1c and 7.NS.1d:

7.NS.1c Model subtraction of rational numbers as adding in the additive inverse, p – q = p + (-q).

7.NS.1d Model subtraction as the distance between two rational numbers on the number line where the distance is the absolute value of their difference.

They replaced 7.G.2 with G.GMD.4 which reads, “Identify three-dimensional objects generated by rotating a two-dimensional (rectangular or triangular) object around one edge.”

7.G.5 has been replaced. The 2010 standard, “Use facts about supplementary, complementary, vertical, and adjacent angles in a multi-step problem to write and use them to solve simple equations for an unknown angle in a figure.”

Now reads:

 

Eighth Grade

They eliminated the 2010 8.EE.1 standard that reads, “Know and apply the properties of integer exponents to generate equivalent numerical expressions. For example, 32 Ă— 3–5 = 3–3 = 1/33 = 1/27.”

A new standard has been added. It’s 8.EE.6, and it reads:

Describe the relationship between the proportional relationship expressed in = and the non-proportional linear relationship = + as a result of a vertical translation. Note: be clear with students that all linear relationships have a constant rate of change (slope), but only the special case of proportional relationships (line that goes through the origin) continue to have a constant of proportionality.

The 8th-Grade Geometry standards have been changed quite a bit. They moved 4th-Grade Measurement and Data standards 4.MD.5a and 4.MD.6 to become 8.G.1a and 8.G.1b, as well as, 8.G.2.  Also, 4.MD.7 becomes 8.G.3. The 7th Grade Geometry standard 7.G.5 and 7.G.2 become 8.6.4 and 8.G.6.

8.G.5, 8.G.7, and 8.G.8 are original standards from 2010. 8.G.10 and 8.G.12 are new. 8.G.11 is the 2010 G.GMD.3 standard.

High School

They added grade classifications to the standards.

N.RN.1 for 9/10-Grades was the Eight Grade Geometry standard 8.EE.1.

They divided up N.CN.3 into two standards. (N.CN.3 and N.CN. 4).

They added two new standards to the Arithmetic with Polynomials and Rational Expressions (A.ARP) section.

A.APR.2 is new, it reads, “Factor polynomials; identifying that some polynomials are prime.”

A.APR.7 is also new, and it reads, “(+) Add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational expressions.”

The Reasoning with Equations and Inequalities (A.REI) section has been reorganized.

A.REI.3b is new, it reads, “(+) Solve exponential and logarithmic equations.”

A.REI.5d is new, it reads, “(+) Solve quadratic inequalities and identify the domain.”

Some 8th-Grade Expressions and Equations standards have been moved to the high school A.REI section. 8.EE.8a, 8.EE.8b, and 8.EE.8c have become A.REI.6a, A.REI.6b, and A.REI.6C.

A.REI.7 combines the 2010 A.REI.8 and A.REI.9 standards.

In the Interpreting Functions (F.IF) section there have been some changes. F.IF.7 sub-standards have been reorganized, but it does not contain new language (beyond grade classifications).

F.IF.8a is new it reads, “(9/10) Use different forms of linear functions, such as slope-intercept, standard, and point-slope form to show rate of change and intercepts.”

Under the Building Functions section (F.BF) there have been some changes. F.BF.1a is a new standard. It replaces the 2010 F.BF.1b standard. F.BF.4b and F.BF.4c have switched places compared to the 2010 standards.

Under the Geometry Congruence Standards (G.CO) there have been some changes.

G.CO.1 was replaced with the 2010 8.G.1 standard. G.C0.3 was replaced with the 2010 8.G.3 standard.

G.CO.9 is a new standard.

Under the High School Geometry Similarity, Right Triangles, and Trigonometry section (G.SRT) there have been a few changes.

G.SRT.2 and G.SRT.3 standards reflect new 2017 language.

I already mentioned that some Geometry Geometric Measurement and Dimension standards (G.GMD) had been moved to 8th-Grade Geometry (G.GMD.3).

Conclusion:

I see few changes to their early elementary math standards. They have delayed some fourth grade standards to eighth grade. Their most significant differences can be observed in the 8th Grade and High School Geometry standards, and then they were primarily swapping standards around.

There have been few new standards added. The Standards for Mathematical Practice from Common Core is still in use. The most significant change for high school is the addition of grade classifications which, I’m sure, is helpful.

The Lawrence Journal-World may think Common Core is gone, what I see is merely a rebrand.

One thought on “Common Core Soon to Be No More in Kansas?

  1. The reason why the new standards are so much like the old standards is because they have to be approved by the ccss board. The board will not approve anything that is too different from ccss. Every single state who has finally ditched Common Core has the same problem. And every single time, there are articles about how they are the same as common core. The standards will most likely change in the next couple of years, because the common core standards don’t work, which is why we ditched Common Core in the first place.

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