Alabama Senate President Pro Tem Kills Anti-Common Core Bill

alabama-state-capitolThe Alabama Anti-Common Core bill dies, more accurately was killed by a State Senator who is confused.

EdWeek reports:

First, the legislative news. The Alabama Senate President Pro Tem, Del Marsh, a Republican, announced that he would not entertain any bills pertaining to the common core for a full Senate vote. That means Senate Bill 403, which passed the Senate Education Committee and would have required the state to drop the standards, has gone belly-up. Marsh’s announcement comes the day after a rally, reportedly consisting of about 300 people, at the capital, during which educators and others urged state lawmakers not to drop the standards.

For someone who killed a fellow Republican’s bill, Marsh had an interesting comment when discussing why he won’t give the bill any oxygen: “I truly have talked to educated people on both sides of this issue and I can’t tell who’s telling the truth … I have talked to people on both sides of this issue who make sense.”

Marsh said the issue could come up during next year’s legislative session. But GOP Sen. Scott Beason, who introduced Senate Bill 403, was fuming after Marsh’s decision, saying his “disappointment is unbelievable.” He added that Marsh initially told him that the bill would get a chance in front of the full Senate, only to see Marsh kill it. Gov. Robert Bentley, a Republican, has previously voted at the state Board of Education to drop the common core, but state Superintendent Tommy Bice supports it.

So because you can’t tell “who is telling the truth” you don’t let your members decide?  That’s his reason?  Isn’t this why it goes through the committee process and why you have debate?  One person’s confusion, albeit the Senate President Pro Tem,  leads to a bill getting dropped?

He said it can be picked back up next year, but that may be too late.  No a wishy washy position is essentially a position for the Common Core and that is something voters in his district should remember.

Photo credit: Jim Bowen via Flickr (CC By 2.0)