A North Carolina Common Core Rebrand Is Almost Certain

Photo credit: Mr. TinDC (CC-By-ND 2.0)
Photo credit: Mr. TinDC (CC-By-ND 2.0)

Nothing like hearing about the final recommendations of a Common Core review commission and see that only “modest” changes are going to be made.

North Carolina Public Radio reports:

The commission recommended revising the K-12 math and English language arts standards with attention to things like developmental appropriateness and clarity in the way a standard is written. But it offered no specifics as to which standards should be changed or how.

Commission co-chair Tammy Covil says she’s disappointed the final recommendations aren’t more specific, but that the 15 months members had to deliberate weren’t enough.

“Rather than do something haphazardly, we backed off of attempts to be too specific or even make specific recommendations of changes to specific standards and decided it was more productive to move forward with generalized recommendations,” Covil said.

Raleigh high school math teacher Greta Lumsden was relieved the commission voted down its most sweeping recommendation—to scrap the K-8 math standards and adopt Minnesota’s.

“As teachers we have invested a lot of time, planning, creating curriculum to help implement these standards, and the taxpayers have invested a lot of money in this also,” she said.

The commission also voted down a proposal to switch back to the traditional high school math sequence.

This, this was most definitely not in the spirit of the review bill that was passed that set this commission up.

2 thoughts on “A North Carolina Common Core Rebrand Is Almost Certain

  1. Shane,
    I’ve been at nearly every meeting and reporting on them as you know. This last one was APPALLING.
    Let me know if you want the run down on what really went on in there.

    -Andrea

  2. ““As teachers we have invested a lot of time, planning, creating curriculum to help implement these standards, and the taxpayers have invested a lot of money in this also,” she said.”

    Yes and No.

    Yes, teachers had to spend time creating curriculum because there was none and our Dept. of Public Instruction told teachers in NC two months before school started that they were using Common Core that Fall.

    No, what was spent was Race To The Top Money and our Dept. of Public Instruction can’t or won’t details how that money was spent on allegedly one round of ‘professional development’ three years ago.

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