New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy: Time to Get Rid of PARCC

Governor-Elect Phil Murphy (D-NJ) announced Dr. Lamont Repollet’s appointment as New Jersey’s new Commissioner of Education

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy, who was sworn in today, announced last week as Governor-Elect that it is time for the Garden State to get rid of PARCC as their state-wide assessment.  Philadelphia public radio station WHYY reports:

At an elementary school in Asbury Park where he announced that Asbury Park School District Superintendent Lamont Repollet will lead the state education department, Murphy said it’s time to scrap those tests.

“We are asking Dr. Repollet to end the failed experiment that has been PARCC testing and create new, more effective and less class time-intrusive means for measuring student assessment,” Murphy said.

Murphy said shorter tests should be developed with teacher input.

He doesn’t have a firm timeline NJ.com reports:

“The answer to the logistics of how it’s done, honestly, I don’t know,” the Democrat said after an unrelated event in Ewing the day before he’s set to be sworn in. “So bear with me on that. But soon.”

He added.

“The notion of assessing kids to make sure we understand how they’re doing, I’m all in for that,” Murphy said Monday. “But these big, white-knuckle, once-a-year, with lots of weeks getting folks tuned up to take a particular test I’m not a fan of. Never have been.”

He noted not only that he has four children but that one of his sisters is a retired teacher from Boston who is against the tests.

“We’re into shorter feedback loops,” Murphy said. “You take the test on Monday and you find out how you did on Friday or the next Monday or something like that.”

“I think educators should be first and foremost at the table to figure out what the actual best model is,” he added.

PARCC’s membership has dwindled to Colorado, District of Columbia, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey and New Mexico. When New Jersey officially leaves only six five states and the District of Columbia will remain in a consortium that once boasted 25 states and DC.

(Update: I was reminded that Colorado left PARCC. They do still purchase some PARCC test items. Louisiana also does a PARCC hybrid. Massachusettes also offers a hybrid assessment. So that really just leaves three states and D.C who use it exclusively.)