Common Core Led to Jeb Bush’s Downfall

Photo credit: Gage Skidmore (CC-By-SA 2.0)
Photo credit: Gage Skidmore (CC-By-SA 2.0)

After the results of the South Carolina Primary were released former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, who finished a distant 4th in the First in the South Primary, announced that he was suspending his campaign.

Yes this is the same Bush who was thought to be the likely presidential nominee of the Republican Party who prior to announcing he was running for President raised over $100 million for his Super PAC.

What happened? Bush certainly was caught up in the anti-establishment wave that has carried Donald Trump. His position on immigration have hurt him as well, but his position on Common Core was a deal breaker for many throughout the party.

Emmett McGroarty of American Principles Project released the following statement:

From the very beginning, Governor Bush’s stubborn support for the low-quality Common Core standards permanently damaged his credibility with voters – and not just with conservatives but with voters across the political spectrum.  

Let Governor Bush’s fate be a lesson for all politicians – voters want to see politicians not only oppose Common Core but actively work to eliminate it and return control of education to local and state government.

Politicians – and it doesn’t matter which party – who fail to fight Common Core will be severely handicapping themselves on Election Day.

McGroarty more than a year ago predicted that Bush would not be electable. From The Washington Post:

Though conservatives oppose the Common Core, general polling has not produced a clear picture of how most Americans feel about the standards. Nevertheless, Emmett McGroarty, a lawyer for the American Principles Project, said Thursday that a pro-Common Core Republican presidential nominee would be “unelectable” in 2016. McGroarty’s warning was a not-so-veiled reference to former Florida governor Jeb Bush, a strong supporter of the Common Core.

Only five GOP candidates remain. Here were their grades on American Principles Project’s Common Core report card, published in August of last year: